Aug

12

Bath Remodeling: Bathroom Floor Plans

By KBC Kitchen & Bathroom

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There are several ways to plan for a successful bathroom remodeling. An old favorite way to draw up bathroom floor plans was to make cut-outs of brown paper or newspaper exactly the size of the fixtures you plan to use in the bath remodel. Then arrange the cut-outs on the floor of the space you will remodel for the bathroom. Another way is to draw a bathroom floor plan to scale on graph paper. Let ½ inch equal 1 foot of the available bathroom design space. Make cut-outs of fixtures drawn to the same scale. Draw lines in this bathroom plan to show the location of windows and doors.

Don’t worry if the finished bath design appears small; remember that the latest bathroom tiles design can make a room appear larger. Then arrange the cut-outs on the floor plan. Be sure to allow for enough space between bathroom fixtures to clean easily. Plan the plumbing so pipes can be put into walls and under the floor where they are hidden from sight. If vertical pipes cannot be placed in the walls, box them in. Plumbing fixtures are heavy; make sure the floor joists are large enough to hold the fixtures. In an old house remodeling, have an experienced builder check the floors before beginning the bath remodeling. They may need more or larger joists.

Aug

7

A Bungalow Bath Remodel

By KBC Kitchen & Bathroom

Forty-five minutes into what what supposed to be a simple bathroom makeover, Fine Homebuilding reader and Breaktime poster, Paul Waterloo realized a total gut job was called for. He and his fiancée decided to use the opportunity to create their dream bathroom. View photos of the remodel’s milestones and read A Decisive Bathroom Remodel for Paul’s first-hand account of the project.

A Bungalow Bath Remodel

A Bungalow Bath Remodel

Improving functionality. Before the remodel, the existing bathroom had a poor layout. You had to step around the toilet to go anywhere, and the light switch for the single circuit was located 5 ft. inside the room. The radiator took up valuable floor space, and the glass-block window allowed no ventilation in the summer and would not seal during the winter.

Unexpected suprises. Once I started taking up the floor tile, I realized the cementboard underlayment was coming up with it and would have to be removed. Then I discovered there were multiple layers of flooring under the cementboard, including the original 1×6 subfloor, tongue-and-groove finish flooring, and a layer of linoleum.